How to Write a Picture Book

Using my published books as examples, I explain and show in detail how the writer and illustrator work together to produce a picture book. Samples from picture books by other authors are also examined. With contributions from the students, I walk through the making of a simple story created “on the spot.” Each participant leaves with a plan for an 8-page picture book.

Audience: K-up (K-2 students will be partnered with older students, if possible)

Setting: Classroom/Auditorium

Time: 45 minutes, plus 15 minutes for questions

Equipment: For a large group, the school must have the capability to project a Power Point presentation onto a screen. I will have a computer but will depend on the school for the projection technology. Students should come equipped with a notebook and pencil.

Where Do You Get Your Ideas?

A motivating slide show details many of the successes and failures I have experienced as a writer, and how they have helped me to

recognize a good idea from one that is not so good. We play a game designed to help students with the brainstorming process. We finish with a writing activity that will allow participants to understand what I mean when I say, “Your eighth or ninth idea is probably better than your first.”

Audience: K-up (K-2 students will be partnered with older students, if possible)

Setting: Classroom/Auditorium

Time: 45 minutes, plus 15 minutes for questions

Equipment: The school must have the capability to project a Power Point presentation onto a screen. I will have a computer but will depend on the school for the projection technology. Students should come equipped with a notebook and pencil.

Getting Along with Ourselves

Using my picture books Most People and Goodnight Whispers, we focus on ways each of us can bring more harmony and good will into our daily lives. Role-playing activities drawn from scenes from everyday life are performed and discussed. A writing activity involving point of view helps to demonstrate the importance of empathy. To wrap up, we play a game of patience and teamwork.

Audience: K-6

Setting: Classroom/Auditorium

Time: 45 minutes, plus 15 minutes for discussion and questions

Equipment: For a large group, the school must have the capability to project a Power Point presentation onto a screen. I will have a computer but will depend on the school for the projection technology. Students should come equipped with a notebook and pencil.

Audience: Grade 3-up

Setting: Classroom/Auditorium

Time: 60 minutes

Equipment: Paper and pens/pencils.

We Think with Ink--

Games and Activities

We Think with Ink is an instruction book for writing teachers, or any teachers looking to incorporate more writing into their daily lessons. The book is filled with word games and writing activities that are meant to instill in students a love for writing and language. Many of the activities show how creative writing can be used to boost self-esteem and to create a general sense of fun in the classroom. Students will learn two or three games (and variations) that allow for hours of fun and learning.

We Think with Ink--

For Teachers

We Think with Ink is an instruction book for writing teachers, or any teachers looking to incorporate more writing into their daily lessons. The book is filled with word games and writing activities that are meant to instill in students a love for writing and language. Many of the activities show how creative writing can be used to boost self-esteem and to create a general sense of fun in the classroom. Students will learn two or three games (and variations) that allow for hours of fun and learning.

Audience: Teachers

Setting: Classroom/Auditorium

Time: 60-90 minutes (half-day and full-day options, also)

Equipment: Paper and pens/pencils. The school must have the capability to project a Power Point presentation onto a screen. I will have a computer but will depend on the school for the projection technology.

 
 
 
 
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